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Full text of "The Stagecoach"

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PEPPESENT WOMBER 
Or PEOPLE AT 
SA/NT MAPY'S FPOM 
E'ACH STATE: 



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LIBRARY 



PRESENTED BY 



The Class of 1943 




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RALEIGH , NORTH CAROLINA 



LI LIIAN JENMNS, EDITOR 



Saint Mary's Sohool Library 



FOREWORD 



As the United States is composed of persons from all parts of the world, so is Saint 
Mary's composed of girls from all parts of the U. S. As all Americans are working 
for victory, so are we working. As Americans are united in this struggle, so are we 
united. Thus Saint Mary's is a cross-section of America, symbolizing the light for 
freedom. 

This phase of school life is another memory ol work well-done, to be treasured 
along with thoughts of the fun in Holt, of the sweet chapel services, of the democracy 
of student government, of the pleasant comradeship of girls, and of profitable studies. 

We. the departing Seniors, leave with memories of full, pleasant years spent in 
playing, in studying, and in working together in Saint Mary's share of the war. 



CONTENTS 



ADMINISTRATION 



ATHLETICS 

FEATURES 

CLASSES 




DEDICATED 

To WILLIAM C. GUESS, whose cheerfulness, humor, and 
consideration have endeared him to sudents and faculty alike. 



14499 



HENRY FELIX KLOMAN 

May 18, 1870— August 29, 1942 






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27ie oft-trod path leading to town — and back 




Spring, and time for club picnics and last get-togethers . 







tM iSs**i 



High ceilings, steep stairs, and bale 



•A-T. ■-■■ *r -T* ■ ■ " . 




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The pen with its memories of music, cokes, floodlights, and benches . 




East Rock, placid and sulid 




Dazzling serenity after riotous departures 



ADMINISTRATED 



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MKS, EENEST CBUIKSHAINK, A.M., M.A., President 

Her willingness to meet everyone more than halfway 
explains partially the devotion and loyalty of those 
who work under her guidance. 



[12] 



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THE KEY. ME, I. HARDING HUGHES, Chaplain 



A fine softball player, an 
interesting teacher, and 
an inspiring preacher, he 
is a good fellow. 



ALBEBT W. TUCKER, Business Manager 



Holding purse strings and 
collecting ration books, he 
does a hard job well. 




THE 




Mabel Margaret Morrison, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Latin, Psychology. History; Rachel Johnson, A.B.. 
M.A., French; Margaret Bailey, A.B., M.A., Spanish; Florence C. Davis, B.O., Expression. 




Mrs. Russell Broughton, A.B., M.A., French. Bible, English; William Conrad Guess, A.B., M.A.. 
History, Sociology, Economics, Government; Elizabeth Bason, A.B., M.A., Home Economics. 



[14] 



FACULTY 




Ruth Holmes Scott, Mus.B., Mus.M.. History oj Music, Piano. Theory; Mrs. Edc\r Alden, Mus.B.. 
Violin, Piano; Russell Broughton. Mus.B.. Mus.M.. F.A.G.O., Organ, Piano, Harmony; Geraldlne 
Cate, A.B., M.A., Voice; Mary Ruth Haig, B.S., Piano. 




Charles Albert Peticru Moore, A.B.. M.A., English; Mrs. Theodore Partrick, Jr., A.B.. Latin, 
Bible. History; Martha Dabney Jones, A.B., M.A.. English; Betty Chauvin Hochenedel, B.Des.. 
Art, Art History. 
Not Photographed: Nell Battle Lewis, A.B., English, Bible. 

[15] 



AND MORE 




Adelaide Winslow, A.B., A.B. in L.S., Assistant Librarian; Mrs. Christopher Wilson Hollowell, 
B.S., Secretarial Courses; Mrs. Harlan C. Brown, A.B., M.A., Librarian; Rebecca Harvey, B.S., 
Physical Education. Hygiene; Ann Christian, Secretarial Courses; Mrs. William C. Guess. B.S., 
Dancing. Physical Education. 




Pecgy Hopkins, A.B., Alumnae Secretary; Julia Jordan, Secretary; Elizabeth G. Tucker, Secre- 
tary to the President; Mary Lewis Sasser, Secretary; Frances Vann. Assistant Secretary. 
Not Photographed: Bessie B. Brown, Office Secretary. 

t 16 1 



FACULTY 




Mrs. Walter Simpson. Housekeeper: Mrs. Nannie H. Marriott. Dietitian: Mrs. L B. Naylor, R.N., 
Resident Nurse. Not Photographed: Dr. H. B. Haywood. Jr.. School Physician, 




More fun than studying. . . . WACC-y smile! . . . Sorry, can't 
Keeps the doctor away. . . . Something on her mind. 

r 17] 



AREN'T THEY NICE? 




They're takin 1 orders now. . . . Charm? Hot-cha! . . . Ibid. . . . 

Brown leaves. . . . liolida) prattle. . . . "Gel your coals!" . . . Well? 

Guess what this is about. . . . The proselytiri kid. . . . Nature's own cl 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICERS 



Front: 

ANNE DICKSON, as President of the Student Body, has administered her job efficiently, under- 
standingly, and well. She has shown dignity and tact in the discharge of her difficult 

duties, and she has commanded the admiration of students and faculty alike. 

MARY ANN DIXON has proved herself a model Vice President and a capable organizer of 
New Girl orientation. 

SARAH TUCKER, as Secretary of Student Government Association, has had a difficult job to 
perform. 

Rear: 

SARAH DAWSON, as Chairman of the Hall Council, has shown strength, diplomacy, and skill 
in guiding and controlling the everyday life of nearly three hundred girls. 

MARJORIE SOAR, President of the day students, has shown unusual leadership in making 
the girls whom she represents more actively a part of campus life. 

These officers have worked untiringly for a smoothly functioning government of the students, by 

the students, and for the students, and have strengthened the I d of understanding between 

students and faculty that grows closer from year to year. 



[ 19 ; 




nces McDavid, Sarah Richardson, Harriet Benton, Mary Ann Dixon, Anne Dickson, President: Sarah Tucker, Margaret 
ckelford, Mary Arden Tucker, Doris Lloyd. 



THE HONOR COUNCIL 

Small in number but great in power and influence, the Honor Council oc- 
cupies a unique place in Saint Mary's world. It meets only when necessary, 
quietlv and unobtrusively, and is trained to he impartial, objective-minded, 
and understanding, with two ideals as guides: the welfare of every girl, and 
the welfare of Saint Mary's. 



20 




Dawson, chairman; Taylor, J., secretary. 

Front run-: Sanborn, Thomas, M., Evans, J., Bruff, Shamburger, Denny. Dickson. 

Back row: Thomas, M. L., King, Dille, Nuchols, Long. C, Legg, M., Archer, Miss Harvey. 



THE HALL COUNCIL 

The Hall Council, directed by die Chairman and consisting of the President 
of the Student Body, Hall Presidents, and two representatives of the day 
students, exercises general supervision over the mechanics of day-to-day 
living, and supplements the Honor Council by dealing with minor matters. 
By means of the Hall Council, Saint Mary's inculcates the principles of demo- 
cratic government, and leaches that fairness to all is the only method 
of group living. 



[21] 



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pkin 

Mi: 



Irman; Clark, 
Dickson, Wli 



mhairmt 
aker, Shi 



Front re 
II. Barnc 



McKinley, Mrs. Guess, Hayes, Chipley, secretary; Dixon. Second i 

/-'i/r/, /7wr; Miss Jones, Miss Harvey, Long, ( !.. Lucas, L.. Suiter. 



THE LEGISLATIVE BODY 



The Legislative Body, law-making division of the Student Government As- 
sociation, enables the student body to take an active part in school govern- 
ment by submitting petitions affecting school life to the legislature. The 
Legislative Body then discusses these and their own suggestions thoroughly, 
weighing their soundness and their practicality, and revises, rejects, or 
passes them accordingly. 

As soon as petitions have been passed and approved by the President of the 
School, they are incorporated into the regulations that govern the student 
body. 

Four faculty representatives, the President of the Student Body, the Presi- 
dent of the Day Students, the Chairman of the Hall Council, and elected 
class representatives constitute the Legislative Body. 

It does a good job. 



[22; 




RGANIZATION 







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Butle 




Lillian Jenkins, Editor of Stage Coach: Mary Brooks Popkins, Editor of Belles; Belty Pender, 
Editor of Bulletin. C. A. P. Moore. Adviser to Publications. 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

What goes on in that dim, dusty publications room before the Belles. Bulletin. 
or Stage Coach comes out? To the uninitiated, the room would be a be- 
wildering confusion ol papers, typewriters, pencils, and voices just before 
the deadline. But lets look over the editors" shoulders and see what happens. 

First. Bkooksie Popkins, who edit- the bi-monthly newspaper, has a job 
which keeps her running from September to June, assigning copy, writing 
headlines, and rewriting copy. Out of the aforementioned chaos ol paper 
emerges the Belles, composed of up-to-date news stories, regular feature 
columns, penetrating editorials, and statistics. One of the finest school con- 
tributions to the war effort is the Belles' sale of war stamps to students every 
other Friday when the paper is delivered to their rooms. 

Second, Betty Pender, editor of the literary magazine, toils all year to 
produce three issues ol the Bulletin, each with a central theme. The first 
was the Alumnae issue; the second, the war issue; and the third, the com- 
mencement issue. She continually calls on her staff to write poems and 



[ 24 ] 



Art Staff, .still 
self-conscious. 
(See last year's 
Stage Coach.) 




short stories, do research work, and turn out informative articles. In her 

own words she says, "My only job is continuing the high standard previously 
set — and that's work enough!" 

Third, to Lillian Jenkins, editor of the Stage Coach, fell the job of 
gelling out a pictorial record of a year at Saint Mary's. Snaps, copy, dum- 
mies, proofs, and picture schedules make up a yearbook editor's life — 
along with meeting deadlines and making innumerable assembly speeches. 
By combining the products of the hardworking Publications Staff, the Art 
Staff, energetically advised by Miss "Hoch," and the photography staff 
headed by Fanny McDavid, the editor produced the Stage Coach. 

Credit, thanks, and sympathy are in order for all these and many more 
for the fine productions of the year — the Belles, Bulletin and Stage Coach. 



he Staff, cheer- 
ful for once. 




OKDEK OF THE CIRCLE 



Mckinley 
President 

Britl 

Clark. E. 
Dawson 
Denny 
I lickson 



Dixon 

Secretary 

Edwards 

Hart 

Jenkins 

Lucas, C. 
Lucas, L. 



Soar 

Treasurer 

Pender 
Popkins 
Richardson 
Sanborn 

Weaver 



As a circle symbolizes unity, so the purpose of this organization is to promote 
a spirit of cooperation between the faculty and the students by the cultivation of high 
ideals of fellowship, service, citizenship, and scholarship, and to assist new students 
in finding their places in school life and activities. 



litt::ra:ry societies 




President Tucker, in chair, argue 



E. A, P, and 



Poems, short stories, essays, reviews, and debates occup) the time, thought, and effort of bnih 
the societies. Competition is high, and at the end of the year the highly-prized cup is awarded 
to the society whose members have produced the best creative writing. 

SIGMA LAMBDA 




President lluti ,/, 



FRENCH CLUB 




I ti the bi-monthly meetings under Miss Rachel Johnson's guidance, members of ilie FRENCH CLUB converse i 
ihat language, sin<j French songs, present puppet shows, hear illustrated talk:- on French lil' 1 . art a and music, an 

listen to President Jenkins. 



DEUTSCHEK VEffiEIN 




The DEUTSCHER VEREIN members learn about and discuss the culture of romantic pre-war Germany. 



[28] 



DOCTORS' DAUGHTERS' CLUB 




ome Nursing courses and collections for local ami Chinese relief find iheir places among the various beneficial 
•ojects of the DOCTORS' DAUGHTERS' CLUB. Britt is president. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB 




MA 



The POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB under William C. Guess becomes ever more alive in ihese perilous days. Iti 
members hear speakers and go places the better to learn the arts of political science. Bassett presides. 



[29] 



THE DRAMATIC CLUB OFFICERS 




THE DRAMATIC CLU li, under the direction of Miss Florence C. Davis, produces plays and encourages creative 
work in the various branches of play production. Radio programs and choric dramas have been favorites dining I He 
year, but the year's production was Much Ado About Nothing. Margaret Shackelford is president. 

Saint Mary's Dramatic Club, a member ol The Carolina Dramatic Association, gave the one-act play, / ntil 
('.harlot Comes Home at the Dramatic Festival held at Chapel Mill in March. The play won first place in its division. 

■GRANDDAUGHTERS' CLUB 




Daughters and granddaughters of former Saint Mary's students edit the College Address Hook, send cigarettes to 
soldiers overseas, and graciously sponsor social affairs. Dora Winters leads them. 



[30; 



ORCHESTRA 




Auditorium performances show that these new. up-and-< 
the eye. Mrs. Alden, second from left, directs. 



Ling ORCHESTRA members can satisfy the car as well as 



GLEE CLUB 




Musical programs given at Christmas anil in the spring reveal the skill the GLEE CLUB acquires during weekly 
practices, and the pleasure the campus derives from its performances. Miss Cate directing, above. 



[31] 



Y.P.SX, COUNCIL 




Entertaining missionary speakers, rolling bandages for Saint Agnes' Hospital, and raising mone\ for the Thompson 
Orphanage, the YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGL'E makes its name really mean something. President Royall 
makes everyhody work. 



CHOIR 




"Sing Alleluia forth in duteous prais 



[32] 



ALTAR GUILD 



Responsibility assuming care 
of the chapel, the ALTAR 
GUILD, composed of Seniors 
and directed by Miss Elizabeth 
Bason, learn the mysteries of 
altar dress and church decora- 
tions. 




A Senior privilege and honor 




A solemn stillness to calm the troubled mind 



CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS BEGAN THUS 




ATHLETI 





Ml 



The ATHLETIC COUNCIL plan- the department's progi 
foi physical linit-ss. 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

lodifies or expands il according in n<-! 



il. and -li 







Oast, Archer, Hackney, McDavid, I ,ii Miss Harvey, Mrs. Guess. 

LETTER CLUB 

The LETTER CLUB is dial group of athleticalh inclined exchisives who are good enough 



??*+*!# 

•V*' 



'<.-... 



miii letter 




Back ion: Britt, Chase, Miss Harvey, Archer, Russe 
row: McCrory, Mrs, Guess, Fannie Cooper. 



IffnihllBli III li-™" 

Thomas, K.. McKinley, McDavid, Woodard, Dawson. Front 



I 36 ] 



Crossed sticks, "forward march." put-outs, back strokes, running feet, dusty courts, and somer- 
saults! Saint Mary's girls were challenged by the government to work harder, play harder, and 
build stronger bodies to help win the war. As Saint Mary's is limited in the number of ways to 
participate in the all-out fight against the enemy, physical education instructors Harvey and Guess 
recognized that at least in this way the girls could perform their patriotic duty. Accordingly, the 
usual program of kickball, hockey, basketball, Softball and the like was supplemented by Danish 
exercises, tumbling, pyramid building, and calisthenics. 

Still, the traditional Sigma-Mu competition was not left mil of the picture. The Mu's. led by- 
President Hackney, and the Sigma's. led by Linton, began the year by electing cheer leaders and 
holding pep meetings to learn catchy cheers. The cheer leaders were: for the Mu's, Cora Lucas, 
Mary Ann Cooper. Nancy Brockman, Frankie Shamburger. Alice Kain. and [Catherine Legg; for the 
Sigma's. Betty \\ inslow. Helen Hocutt. Jane Dille, Dee iXucbols. Sally Ramsey, and Fannie Cooper. 
For the rest of the vear, mournful dirges and rousing hurrahs were heard at every game. 

Swimming classes started the first full week of school and several girls passed their year's swim- 
ming requirements during the first few days. As the weeks passed the list grew and finally 
culminated with fifty girls taking Senior Life Saving. For this they received an All-Star award 
which was the result of sixteen hours of instruction, "playing drowned." and written and practical 
tests. 

These neophytes of [he stage work haul to interpret moods through dance. Cora Lucas is president. 




«C* 



■ ; -' ■'-..- - 



The Orchesis, too. was organizing, with fifty girls reporting to the first meeting. President Cora 
Lucas and her group's first project was Posture Week. This was a week of good posture posters, police- 
men, and red and blue tags which finally ended in assembly Thursday when Sallie McKinley was 
acclaimed Posture Queen and Virginia Hart and Ellen Oast second and third respectively. From then 
on the girls worked on numbers to be presented on physical education day in the spring. 

KICKBALL 

Kickball, a major sport, brought out scores of volunteers for afternoon games. A record num- 
ber of seventy was reported for first practice and for several weeks the Mu's and Sigma's fought 
violently to kick harder and further and run faster than the others. The Mu's won out. taking 
the last game 15-12 before the whole student body. The students saw Ticky LaRoque and Edith 
Compton score three runs each, and Laurie Lucas make six put-outs for the Mu's in this final 
game. Hurst, Drewry, Godfrey. Brooke. M. Kinsey, Maybelle Smith. Brill. Oast, LaRoque and 



07 



Compton made the Sigma team; and Russell. H. Williams. McDavid, L. Lucas. McCrory, E. Thomas, 
Cannon, C. Long. Archer, and M. Thomas made the Mu team. 

Girls receiving All-Star awards were Brooke. Godfrey, Hirst, M. kinsev. L. Lucas. Smith. 
Williams. McCrary, McDavid. and Russell. 

SOKE SHINS, WIDE GBINS 






. 



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HOCKEY 

Soon a small cork hall replaced the rubber one used in kickball, and hockey, that fast and excit- 
ing game, had arrived again. Even new girls who had known nothing of hockey joined the veterans 
in putting on shin-guards and grabbing sticks. However, not enough girls were out for the sport; so 
first teams and an all star team could not lie picked. Still, volunteers from the group packed up 
their equipment, and journeyed out to Meredith lo [day. This was not a competitive game; it was 
undertaken for the love of the game itself. This trip showed skillfulness by goal-keeper Helena 
Williams, speed by Caroline Long, and smooth coordination by Anne Hull. Dickson. Riley, Broun, 
and McKinley, also played with swiftness and ability. 



BASKETBALL 

With the advent of winter, sports moved indoors for long-awaited basketball practice and com- 
petition. Tin' girls practiced guarding, shooting, and dribbling for weeks, becoming polished for 
the tournament, in which the Mil's and Sigma's both won a game; the third decided the winner. The 
gym was crowded, cheering was loud, and the playing smooth and beautiful. Time and again the 
Sigma forwards Brooke. Hirst. Gates ripped through the Mu defense. The guarding of Hocutt, 
Dawson, and Britt held the Mu forwards in check, hut Grantham and Russell often broke through 
the tight Red defense lo sink long, beautiful shots. When the whistle blew, the Sigma's had won 
and their total score was 64 points to the Mu's 47. Girls receiving All-Star awards were Britt. Hocutt. 
Dickson. Hirst. Gates. Grantham, Laurie Lucas. Dawson. Russell, and Brooke. 



38 



'S WON * » 9 TCH, TCH, MU'S! 







[39] 



VOLLEY BALL 

Next came volley ball and for days strong arms and lightning jumps kept the white ball sail- 
ing through the air over the high net. The result of this was that the Sigma's were again 
victorious in the tournament. Girls considered fast enough and strong enough to be on the All-Star 
team were Hull. Hocutt, Moore. Bass. Rvlander. Brooke. Hirst. Archer, and Sanborn. 



. . . AND OTHER THINGS 

In April the Letter Club, selecting girls who had been on two All-Star teams, took in Anne 
Hirst. Anne Dickson, Jean McCrory, Fanny Lee Brooke, and Laurie Lucas. 

\thletics again took to the warm outdoors, and Softball and tennis took the limelight. Softball 
practices were held three times a week and tennis competition was carried on in the ladder manner, 
each girl challenging the one above her. Every day the courts were filled, balls sailed smoothly 
over the net and feet slid here and there as girls got rid of the winter lethargy. 

During all ibis time the regular gym classes had been working on Danish exercises, pyramid 
building, and dance compositions to be given on Physical Education Day. For weeks the Senior gym 
classes bad heard ""Ready begin! ' and "1, 2, 3, 4, change!" 

On April 28 the program began at four o'clock with competitive drilling by the paltoons, ad- 
vanced and intermediate. Then the gym classes demonstrated their exercises in the Dairish manner. 
Miss Harvey leading them through intricate exercises and changes. For a climax of the afternoon's 
activities the classes demonstrated pyramid building, making large and beautiful patterns. That 
night Mrs. Guess presented an informal program composed of modern dance exercises, syncopation 
compositions, original compositions, choral speech and movement, a solo, and a series of rhythmic 
designs executed to music. Sallie Mckinley soloed in original dance entitled "Mood." The dance 
club recital group was composed of McKinley, No: ton, Senay, Ferguson, Cora Lucas. Kain, Archer, 
and Winters. All but McKinley took part in ai original composition "Crescendo." to the music 
of Shostakovich's Prelude Number 16. This recital climaxed the work of the Orchesis of the year. 

The year completed, the equipment oiled and put away, the girls, stronger and brighter, 
finished the year better physical specimens then when they began. Thus the physical education depart- 
ment has played its role in die nationwide attempt for stronger, healthier, happier citizens. 



TRAINING AND TEAMWORK SCORE 







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BATS 





. BOUNCES 



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"March without the noise of threatening dmms. . . ." 

Wednesday afternoons! No girl will ever forget skating at Pullen Park, bowling, or hiking, and 
no Senior will ever forget the first week of drilling when ROTC officers from State College came 
over with instructions to teach the "Bel Irs how to execute commands quicklv and smoothly. Soon 
giggling girls were silenced by "Wipe that smile oil. sister! and drilled because so popular that it 
was decided at midyear that the whole student body was to be organized into platoons. The campus 
was alive with steady steps, shouts, and uniforms, from eight platoons came the commands For- 
ward march; To the rear, march; By the right flank, march: Hall: At Ease. 

On April 28 the drilling was brought to a close with competition among the three advanced 
platoons and the five intermediate platoons. The girls saluted, right faced, marched, and did column 
and flank movements before the judges. Russell Broughton, William C. Guess, and Captain Stott from 
State College. Platoon III (2d year girls) led by Major Jerry Stockard won first place in the ad- 
vanced group; and Platoon II (new girls I led by Captain Bob Farthing, won first place in the 
intermediate group. Following the competition. Platoon Sergeant Marjorie Shackelford led 
her platoon. III. through intricate formations. 

The cold March winds; commands; Jerry's famous words: "Some things are excusable, some mis- 
takes have to be made, but one thing is inexcusable — saluting with your left hand;" platoon Ser- 
geants Castellow, Eleanor Thomas, and Shackelford shrieking orders; and Brooksie forever blowing 
her whistle; all these and many unrecorded bright spots of drilling will be long remembered. 

By executing commands with speed and precision, the girls learned to think and to react 
quickly, tw r o requisites in war. They know what their brothers and friends are undergoing in their 
basic training. 



I II 1 



WHEN THAT MARCH WIND BLEW 




[42] 








T 





TT^ 





MARSHALS 

Smiles ~ and n dash oj surprise . . . 




Lovely, gracious, well-groomed girls. Mary, Pauline. Ellen, Mary Ann, 
and Daphne are fine examples of the poise. looks, intelligence, and charm 
lor which Saint Mary's girls are known. 

Even when saving "Shhh" to chattering girls in assembly and chapel, 
they maintain that poise and ellii iencv which the student body recognized 
so well when electing llieill. 



t 'I I 



1943 
MONOGRAM GIRLS 



Annually the faculty selects six girls who. to an unusual degree, exemplify 
student loyalty and devotion to the school and its interests. This year 
they are 



Mary Elizabeth Bassett 

Sarah Nelson Dawson 
Anne Talbott Dickson 



Sarah Louise McKinley 
Marjorie Elizabeth Soar 
Jane Allensworth Taylor 



EIGHT 
OUTSTANDING GIRLS 



The students also select eight girls whom they believe to be the most out- 
standing students in school, the selection being based on scholarship, leader- 
ship, achievement. TIih is the highest honor, outside student government 
offices, which the student body can confer. 



the 



page 



[ 45 




Outstanding 



ANNE TALBOTT DICKSON 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



MARY ANN DIXON 
\\ ilmington, N. C. 




[46; 



GIRLS 



SARAH NELSON DAWSON 
Cramerton, N. C. 





SARAH LOUISE McKINLEY 
Birmingham, Alabama 



( 47 




Outstandini 



SARA DAPHNE RICHARDSON 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



CORA COX LUCAS 
Greensboro. N. C. 




[48] 



GIRLS 



MARY BROOKS POPKINS 

Leesburg, Virginia 





LILLIAN VAUGHAN JENKINS 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



[49] 



DANCE MARSHALS 

These are the Dance Marshals, responsible for lively "girl-breaks" and plush formal dances. Cora 
Lucas is chief. 




Fiout row: Whitaker, Legg, K. 

Second run-: Ramsey. deRosset. Lucas. G, chief; Sloan, Thomas, E. 

Back row: Woodard, Clarke. Burns. Stum'. Sanborn. 



THE JUNIOE*SENIOB, 1942 




SENIOR DANCE, CHRISTMAS 




Your mouth's mien. . . . Don't look now, but. . . . Cozy, huh? . . . 

Dance marshals, on parade. . . . Cute decorations! . . . Fireside chat. . . . There's somepin' ahout a uniform. 

Can we laugh too? . . . Brightening the corner. . . . Lose something? . . . 



[51 



te& jfcafcj ft &Kte£ 



CENTENNIAL PAGEANT 




Saint Mary's becomes a church school in 1897. 

Dr. Smedes as teacher. . . . 

First arrivals. . . . More Confederate soldiers. 



Confederate soldiers pass through campus in 1865. 



1842*19 42 




The soldiers nn |he campus in 1865. . . . First arrivals 

Saturday night dancing in the early 1900's 

Mtss Katie and the Lower School children. '.'.'. The first confirmation, 



held in the parlo 



CENTENNIAL COMMENCEMENT 




It's so peaceful. . . . Sunday morning. . . . Step it up, gals. . . . 
"Good-bye, School." . . . 'Member the spirea? . . . Ad infinitum, . . 
Important people. . . . Both sides ... of the matter. . . . "N more robes. 



Co I 



mencement Speaker Dean Virginia Gildersleeve, and Mrs. Cruikshank. 




While underclassmen waited under a hot May sun. Senior* 
received their well-earned reward. 



THAT LAST DAY, 1942 




- .-^^s^ssssini 



Left, right, one, two. ... On and on and on. . . . 
Waiting for Dean Gildersleeve, . . . Won't be long now. . 
Still more of it. . . , End of the trail. . . , How sad. , , . 



The suspense is kill 



C L A 



^ 





Sallie Mckinley. President; Pauline McNeny, Vice President; Nancy Noiton, Treasurer; Beverly Broun, Secretary. 



SENIORS 



Saint Marys College graduates of 1943, who for two years or more have worked toward 
a diploma, are now faced with the alternatives of more school, a job, or marriage. The 
majority of the Seniors will continue in college, but next year naturally a grealer number 
than usual will become workers or wives. That they will do well whatever they choose is 
evident to those of us who have avidly watched them in their activities throughout the year. 

These inhabitants of Castle Holt — that palace of privileges and Junior dreams — have 
commanded our respect and admiration in their roles as "Big Sisters," Handbook group 
leaders, and advisers. But even so, we shall probably remember the Seniors as friends 
rather than as Student Covernment Officers for instance, who at appropriate limes have 
been sympathetic, but not indulgent; loyal, but not blindly so; helpful, but not superior; 
and at all times, lovable. 



[58] 



Seniors 



MARY ELIZABETH 

BASSETT 

Bassett, Virginia 

Betty, plaid coats. Campus 

Notes, V.M.I., petite- 

ness, Choir 

Publications Staff; Political 
Science Club, President 43; 
Dramatic Club 41; Glee 
Club 42; Altar Guild 43; 
Choir 43; Hall Council 42; 
Mu. 




Basse It 
Britt 



Bellamy 
Broun 



LILLIAN MAXWELL BELLAMY 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Fluttering hands, lieutenants, paradoxes, "darling' 

Publications Staff 43; E.A.P. Literary Society; French 
Club; Political Science Club 42; Dramatic Club 43; 
Granddaughters' Club 42; Orchesis 43; Glee Club; Altai- 
Guild 43; Mu. 

BETTY LOU BRITT 

Mount Airy. N. C. 

"Britt," attractive, ideals, Faerie Queene, sports, "Lulu" 

Publications Staff, Managing Co-editor 43; Sigma Lambda 
Literary Society, President 43; Political Science Club 43; 
Doctors' Daughters' Club. President 43; Orchesis 43; 
Organ Certificate 43; Letter Club; Basketball, Kickball 
43; Volleyball; Altar Guild 43; Circle 43; Glee Club 42; 
Sigma. 

BEVERLEY CLAY BROUN 

Charleston, West Virginia 

"Bev," horses, gold bars, pleasantness, art 

Political Science Club 43; Publications Staff 43; French 
Club 43; Dramatic Club 43; Art Certificate; Altar Guild 
43; Secretary Senior Class; Editor Entre Nous; Sigma. 
[59] 




1943 



Burns 
Chase 



CastelloTv 
Cooper 



MARY deROSSET BURNS 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

Curlers, giggles, checked 

suits, free-wheeling. 

diets, "Sir?" 

Political Science Club 43; 
Dramatic Club 42; Grand- 
daughters' (vlub ; Orchesis 
43; Tennis; All Star; Altai- 
Guild 43; Dance Marshal 
43; Marshal; Sigma. 



MARIAN GAIL CASTELLOW 

Windsor, N. C. 

Jitterbug, sophistication. Nags Head, horn rims, marching 

Doctors' Daughters" Club; Publications Staff 43; Political 
Science Club 43; Orchesis 43; Altar Guild 43; Sigma. 

BETTY LANDON CHASE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Quietness, basketball, sincerity, dependability, smiles 

Dramatic Club; Art Certificate 12; Hockey; Volleyball; 
Letter Club 42; Sigma. 



MARY ANN COOPER 

Henderson, N. C. 

Determination, eyes. men. Chapel Hill, poise 

Dramatic Club; Political Science Club 43; Marshal; 
Dance Marshal 12; Altar Guild 43; Mu. 

f 60 1 



Seniors 




( !oi nick 
Dickson 



Dawson 
Dixon 



MARY BRIDGER 

CORNICK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Swimming, good sport, 
onions, fun, congeniality 

Glee Club 42; All Star; Mu. 

SARAH NELSON DAWSON 

Cramerton, N. C. 
"Sadie," modesty, fairness, pink slips, sweetness, charm 

French Club; Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club 
42; Lelter Club 42; Life Saving 42; Basketball; Volley- 
ball; Softball; Legislative Body 43; Circle; Vice President 
Class 42; Chairman Hall Council 43; Sigma. 

ANNE TALBOTT DICKSON 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

"Annie," capability, fun 'n' frolic, I irginia. brains, 

versatility 

Sigma Lambda Literary Society; French Club; Political 
Science Club 43; President Student Body 43; Editor Entre 
Nous 43; Hall Council 42; All Star; Hockey; Basketball; 
Y.P.S.L. Council; Legislative Body 43; Altar Guild 43; 
Circle; Secretary-Treasurer Class 42; Mu. 

MARY ANN DIXON 

Raleigh, N. C. 

"Pretty.'" popularity, loveliness, men, drawings 

Dramatic Club 42; Orchesis 43; Political Science Club; 
Vice President Student Body 43; Chairman Constitutional 
Committee 43; Hockey Kickball; Y.P.S.L. Council; Altar 
Guild 43; Legislative Body 43; Honor Council 43; Circle; 
Mu. 

[61] 




194 



Drewry 

J. Evan 



MARY HOLT DREWRY 

Henderson, N. C. 

"Holt," heels, hair-do, 
easels 

Deutseher Verein 43; Dra- 
matic Club 43; Art Certifi- 
cate; Sigma. 

ESSIE BRYCE EVANS 

Forksville, Virginia 

Offices, fun, ability, reliability, siveetness. thoroughness 

Publications Staff 43; Altar Guild 43; Constitutional 
Committee 43; Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club 
42; Basketball; Mu. 

JANE CARLTON EVANS 

Washington, N. C. 

""/• C.J smoothness, 1 alentines, Bugs Bunny, individuality 

E.A.P. Literary Society; Political Science Club; Dramatic 
Club 42; Orchesis 43; Basketball; Altar Guild, President 
43; Choir 42; Hall Council 43; Legislative Body 42; 
Sigma. 

JANE COUNCIL GREGG 

Lake Waccamaw, N. C. 

Dignity, beauty. Alee, mail, grace 

Marshal; Sigma Lambda Literary Society; Political 
Science Club 43; Dramatic Club 42; Orchesis 43; Legis- 
lative Body 42; Class President 12: Basketball 42; 
Hockey 43; Mu. 

[62] 



Seniors 



ELIZABETH ACRA 

HACKNEY 

Wilson, N. C. 

"Temperamental," Lib. 

Navy, gayety, work, 

headache powders 

Publications StafI, Exchange 
Co-editor 43; Political Sci- 
ence Club; Dramatic Club: 
Orchesis 43; President of 
Mus 43; Basketball; Altar 
Guild 43; Mu. 




Hackney 
Jenkins 



Hampton 
Kane 



HENRIETTE DARCAN HAMPTON 

Raleigh, N. C. 

"Henny." hair ribbons, personality, grades, dances 

E.A.P. Literary Society 40; French Club 43; Sigma. 

LILLIAN VAUGHAN JENKINS 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

"Juby, ' tokens, John, hard work, "Snooks," pictures 

Publications Staff; Sigma Lambda Literary Society; Art 
Staff 43; French Club, President 43; Editor of Stage 
Coach 43; Legislative Body 42; Altar Guild 43; Circle 
43; Editor of Handbook 42; Mu. 

MARGUERITE LaROQUE KANE 

Kinston, N. C. 

Loveliness, fun, intelligence, clothes, wedding bells 

Marshal; Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club 42; 
Orchesis 43; Kickball 43; Hall President 43; Sigma. 
[ 63 ] 







Lloyd 
McKinley 



Lucas 
McNeny 



DORIS WYNONA LLOYD 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Helpfulness, sincereness, 
friendliness. Library 

Deutscher Verein, President 
43; Honor Council; Mu. 

CORA COX LUCAS 

Greensboro, N. C. 

"Lit." wit, dances. S.A.E.. originality, friendliness 

Political Science Club 43; Orcbesis, Secretary 42, Presi- 
dent 43; All Star; Circle 43; Dance Marshal 41, 42, 
Chief Dance Marshal 43; Cheer Leader 42, 43; Mu. 

SARAH LOUISE McKINLEY 

Birmingham, Alabama 

/'///■ muff. Erskine, vivacity, family, leadership, bears 

Publications Stall; E.A.P. Literary Society; French Club; 
Dramatic Club; Orcbesis; Glee Club 42; Expression Cer- 
tificate 43; Letter Club; All Star; Legislative Body 43; 
Altar Guild 43; Choir 42; Circle, President 43; Hall' Pres- 
ident 42; Class President 43; Posture Queen 13; Editor- 
in-Chief Entre Nous 43; Mu. 

PAULINE HETHORN McNENY 

Henderson, N. C. 

Graciousness, helpfulness, prettiness, neatness, 
innnaciilateness 

Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club; Orchesis 43; 
Altar Guild 43; Hall President 43; Vice President 43; 
Mu, 

[64] 



seniors 



JEAN ANDERSON 

MORRIS 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Tad, letter writing, neat- 
ness, capability 

Sigma. 







Morris 

Oast 



NANCY REED NORTON 

Brooklyn, New York 
Colorfulness, programs, capability. The I niversity. Rags 

Stafl ; Political Science Club, Secretary 
Group 43; Altar Guild 43 



Publications 
Orchesis 43 



Dance Recit 
Class Treasurer 43; Chairman of Assembly Programs 43 
Mu. 



Norton 

Olive 



ROBENA ELLEN OAST 

Portsmouth. Virginia 

Smiles, curly head. Navy, marshaling, luvableness 

Political Science Club 43; Doctors" Daughters'; All Star 

Volleyball 42; Athletic Council 43; Basketball 42; Kick- 
ball 43; Volleyball 42; Altar Guild 43; Marshal 43; 
Sigma. 



VALERIA VIRGINIA OLIVE 

Lexington, N. C. 
Town, Duke, relaxation, chuckles, talkativeness 

Political Science Club; Dramatic Club; Altar Guild 43; 
Sigma. 

[65] 




1943 



Osborn 
Popkins 



MARGARET ANDREWS 
OSBORN 

Welch, West Virginia 

"Peg," Davidson, little store, 
orchids, eyes 

Political Science Club 43; 
Orchesis 43; Glee Club 43; 
Altar Guild 43; Mu. 



ELIZABETH JORDAN PENDEB 

Norfolk, Virginia 
Rose Red, individuality, drawl, gremlins, bangs 

Publications Staff; Sigma Lambda Literary Society; 
Political Science Club; Altar Guild 43; Editor of the 
Bulletin 43; Sigma. 

MARY BROOKS POPKINS 

Leesburg, Virginia 
Brooksie, personality, friendliness, "opium," vitamins 

Publications Staff, Editor of Belles 43; E.A.P. Literary 
Society; Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club; Altai- 
Guild 43; Circle; Sigma. 

SARA DAPHNE RICHARDSON 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

"D," pixie, shavetails, brown eyes, marshal lines, 
gracefulness 

Dramatic Club 42; Orchesis 43; Organ Certificate; Basket- 
ball 43; Legislative Body 42; Altar Guild 43; Circle 43; 
Hall President 42; Dance Marshal 42; Chief Marshal 
43; Mu. 

[66] 



seniors 



HELEN CRUIKSHANK 
RILEY 

Camp Edwards, Mass. 

Seriousness, blue eyes, dry- 
wit, popularity, 
concentration 

Political Science Club 43; 
Doctors' Daughters', Secre- 
tary 43; Basketball 42; 
Altar Guild 43; Life Saving 
42; Sigma. 




Riley 
Sanborn 



Royall 
Shackelfo 



ELIZABETH WADDELL ROYALL 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

"Lib," baby blue eyes, Carolina, naturalness, 

conscientiousness 

Sigma Lambda Literary Society; Political Science Club 
43; Sextette 42; Glee Club 42; Volleyball 42; Softball 
42; Y.P.S.L. Council, President 43; Choir, Crucifer and 
Cantor 43; Hall Council 42; Sigma. 

SARAH ELIZABETH SANBORN 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

"Sally," blondness, blushes, uniforms, laughs 

Publications Staff, Managing Co-editor 43; Political 
Science Club 43; Dramatic Club, Treasurer 43; Expression 
Certificate; Volleyball 42; Altar Guild 43; Hall President 
43; Dance Marshal 43; Circle 43; Co-manager, Little 
Store 43; Mu. 

MARGARET SPENCER SHACKELFORD 

Martinsville, Virginia 

"Shack," dependability, credulity, airplanes, charm. 

brass buttons 

Political Science Club, Vice President 43; Dramatic Club, 
President 43; Doctors' Daughters', Treasurer 43; Treasurer 
of Orchesis 43; Y.S.P.L. Council; Altar Guild 43; Honor 
Council; Choir 42; Mu. 
[67] 




1943 



MARJORIE ELIZABETH 
SOAR 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Efficiency, likableness, blond 
hair, neatness 

E.A.P. Literary Society; 
Dramatic Club 42; Circle, 
Treasurer 43; Hall Council 
42; President of Day Stu- 
dents 43; Sigma. 



MARGARET ANDREWS STONE 

Greensboro, N. C. 

"Meg," Goddess, pompadours, telephone calls. Little Store 

Publications Staff, Exchange Co-manager 43; Political 
Science Club 43; Dramatic Club 43; Orchesis 43; Altar 
Guild 43; Dance Marshal 43; Co-manager, Little Store 
43; Mu. 

JANE ALLENSWORTH TAYLOR 

Henderson, N. C. 

Attractiveness, sincerity, cheerfulness, depth, seriousness 

E.A.P. Literary Society 43; French Club 43; Glee Club 
43; Altar Guiid 43; Secretary Hall Council 43; Choral 
Speech Club 43; Sigma. 

MARY LUCILE THOMAS 

Wilson, N. C. 
Smiles, serenily, mutability, intelligence 

Art Staff 42; Sigma Lambda Literary Society; Dramatic 
Club 42; Granddaughters' Club; Orchesis; Volleyball 42; 
Altar Guild; Hall President 43; Sigma. 

[ 68 ] 



eniors 



MARY LOUISE 

THOMSON 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

"Weeze" dramatics, boogie 
woogie, originality, dances 

Publications Staff 42; Po- 
litical Science 43; Dramatic 
Club; Expression Certifi- 
cate; Volleyball 42; Altai- 
Guild 43; Mu. 

Agnes Cornelia Tongue 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Current events, good nature, 
conscientiousness 

Class Winner Time Cur- 
rent Events Test 42, 43; 
Sigma. 








1 



Tucker 



Thomson 



Williams 



Tongue 



Winters 



SARAH FRANCES TUCKER 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Fair play, angelicity, earnestness, brown eyes, seriousness 

Art Staff 41; E.A.P. Literary Society, Secretary 42, Presi- 
dent 43; Political Science Club 43; Doctors' Daughters", 
Secretary 42; Granddaughters' Club; Softball 42; Y.P.S.L. 
Council; Honor Council ; Hall President 41; Vice President 
Centennial Drive 42; Secretary Student Government As- 
sociation 43; Acolyte 43; Mu. 

MARGARET MERIWETHER WILLIAMS 

Asheville, N. C. 
Peggy, pictures, curls, letters, enthusiasm 

Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club 43; Volleyball 
42; Altar Guild 43; Mu. 

DORA SOMPAYRAC WINTERS 

Washington, D. C. 

"Dodie," sleepiness, cuteness. Annapolis, smartness 

Publications Staff 42; E.A.P. Literary Society; French 
Club; Political Science Club 43; Dramatic Club; Grand- 
daughters' Club, President 43; Orchesis 43; Altar Guild 
43; Dance Recital Group 43; Mu. 

[69] 



SENIOR SUPERLATIVES, 1943 STYLE 




73ctti/ _ Pender 
Originality 




T^etti/ &assett~ 
Cu ten ess 




d?ib 7/ackney 
Sportsmanship 




ffetty dSou ft-Titf' 
Versatility 




Sal tie TftcXinlei/ 
^Atl-Jround, 




Trffarqie ^AacAelford 
friendliness 




I v^w** 



Sit 'en Oas 
sfftra ctiveness 




Daphne APtcnardson 
cSty/e. 




Cora JHucas 
Wit- 




7?rooksie Popkins 
SUccess 



[70 



WATCH THE BIRDIE . . 




Easter bunny, no doubt. . . . Rhapsody in while. . . . "Won't you step." 
Some jane! . . . Perky bow, too. . . . Expectin' rain? . . . 
Ouch, my nose! . . . Sumpin' ya smell, Neva? . . . 



AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS! 




Merry Thomas. . . . We three. ... La glamour (?) . . . 
Contrast, . . . The gruesome twosome. . . . Howdy, Burns! . 
Romeos, wherefore are you? . . . Airplanes? . . . Peg 'n* Ellen. 



JUMBLE 




STRAIGHTEN 'EM OUT YOURSELF! 




Maria Lt_ 



President; Brity Barnes, President; Nancy Br ockman, Treasurer; Betsy Long, Secretary. 



JUNIORS 



As always at Saint Mary's, the Junior Class is the largest in school. For 
the first lew weeks of school these girls, who are to succeed the Seniors as 
leaders and office-holders, experienced the usual difficulties of college 
freshmen. But in t\ui' time the Juniors grew used to English themes, 
biology labs, and European history tests, and after being introduced to 
the mysteries of student government, they began to acquire the saroir faire 
necessary to understand campus life and laws. With the Seniors' timely 
help and hints the novices soon became Nestors, and first took minor offices, 
then major ones, in their tride. 



[74] 



Juniors 



Irene Estelle Allen 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Juanita Anderson 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Charlotte Winston Armistead 
Kinston, N. C. 



Virginia Louise Atkins 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Elizabeth Virdin Barnes 
Charlottesville, Virginia 

Vidette Savage Bass 
Wilson, N. C. 



Jane Kestler Bell 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Harriet Benton 

Jackson, Tennessee 

Meredith Boaze 

Lexington, N. C. 



Nancy McGee Brockman 
Greenville, S. C. 

Fanny Lee Brooke 

Alexandria, Virginia 

Jean Brooks 

Kinston, N. C. 



Elizabeth Graves Burke 
Hendersonville, N. C. 

Adelaide Caldwell Butler 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Gladys Elaine Cherry 
Speed, N. C. 



Jane Clark Cheshire 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Agatha Heritace Chipley 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Elizabeth Scott Clark 
Lynchburg, Virginia 




Juniors 




First row: 

Mary Fox Clarke. Maysville, Kentucky 

Margaret Morton Cole. Birmingham, Alabama 

Marjorie Glyn Cole, Raleigh, N. C. 

Edith French Compton, Charlottesville, Virginia 



Third ran : 

Charlotte Elizabeth Crawford. Raleigh, N. C. 

Martha Cawthorn Crook. Jackson, Tennessee 

Emma Britt Davis. La Grange, N. C. 

Mildred Nelson Denny, Soarsdale, New York 



S( j coiifl row: 

Mary "Ethel Coons. Winston-Salem. N. C. 
Fannie Gloss Cooper. Henderson. N. C. 
Alice Louise Craig. Concord, N. C. 
Mary Faith Craig. Raleigh, N. C. 



Fourth row: 

Margaret Hiske deRosset. Fayetteville. N. C. 

Jane Evans Dille. Roanoke. Virginia 

Rebecca Wood Drake. Monroe, N. C. 

Anne Barton Dysart, Greenville, South Carolina 



r?6i 



Juniors 




First row: 

Elizabeth Liles Edwards, Tarboro, N. C. 
Josephine Skinner Flanagan, Greenville, N. C. 
Mary Virginia Freeman, Clarksville, Virginia 
Elizabeth Wood Gaither, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Second row: 

Mary Tom Gilman. Portsmouth, Virginia 
Katherine Louise Godfrey, Jacksonville, Florida 
Louise Toler Gower. Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Lena Mae Grantham. Stantonsbure, N. C. 



' 



Third roic: 

Ann Delamater Greene, Scarsdale, New York 

Mary Patricia Gwyn, Waynesville, N. C. 

Joan Kirk Hamner. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Jane McGown Harrison, Greenville, South Carolina 

Fourth row: 

Mary Virginia Hart. Chatham. Virginia 
Betty Kerr Harwell. Columbia. South Carolina 
Ruth Williams Hayes. Charlotte. N. C. 
Betty Browne Hicks, Raleigh. N. C. 



[77] 



Juniors 




First row: 

Anne Heston Hirst, Purcellville, Virginia 
Helen Ann Hocutt, Henderson, N. C. 
Mary Adams Hough, Raleigh, N. C. 
Mary Pierce Johnson, Weldon, N. C. 

Second row: 

Judith Kaplan, Raleigh, N. C. 

Clara Leigh Kemper. Shelby, N. C. 

Bettie Alexander Kendrick. Raleigh, N. C. 

Elizabeth Marie Kilbury. Lillle Roek, Arkansas 



Third row: 

Antoinette McComb King. Lynchburg, Virginia 
Phyllis McCord Kinsey. East Orange, New Jersey 
Cornelia Hobgood Knott. Faimville, N. C. 
Katherine Louisa Lecc, Henderson, N. C. 

Fourth row: 

Maria Southerland Legg, Henderson, N. C. 
Mary Lynn. Lewis, Greensboro. N. C. 
Mandalee Linton, Nashville, Tennessee 
Elizabeth McCaw Long, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



[78] 



Juniors 




First row: 

Hannah Richardson Lyon, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Mary Marcaret Mahone, Williamsburg, Virginia 
Mary Louise Martin, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 
Jane Winter Maultsby, Whiteville, N. C. 

Second row: 

Marilyn Marie Mitchell. Roanoke, Virginia 
Ellen French McCann, Franklin. Virginia 
Miriam Alice McDonald, Raleigh, N. C. 
Emily Iris McMillan, Wilmington, N. C. 



Third row: 

Mary West Paul, Norfolk, Virginia 
Carolyn Adele Pemberton. Raleigh, N. C. 
Mary Hodces Person, Stantonshurg, N. C. 
Mary Ann Price, Kingsport, Tennessee 

Fourth row: 

Mary Darden Quinerly, Ayden, N. C. 
Henrietta Racland, Raleigh, N. C. 
Sally Wyatt Ramsey. Lynchburg, Virginia 
Sarah Flud Richardson. Asheville. N. C. 



[79] 



Juniors 




First row: 

Patsy Maria Rodcers, Warrenton, N. C. 
Mary Faith Edens Rogers, Bennettsville, S. C. 
Martha Joyce Ross, Clinton. N. C. 
Pattie Joaxine Ross, Clinton. N. C. 

Second row: 

Frances Davenport Rylander. Americus, Georgia 
Ann Marie Seltman, Raleigh, N. C. 
Elizabeth Coleman Shaw. Portsmouth. Virginia 
Ann Blount Skinner. Greenville, N. C. 



Third row: 

Marco Smith, Birmingham, Alabama 

Mary Foster Sowell. Birmingham, Alabama 

Sara Elizabeth Stockton. Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Cora Harden Stratford, Graham. N. C. 

Fourth row: 

Caroline Brachenridce Talbot, Norfolk, Virginia 

Caroline Davis Taliaferro. CranfWd, New Jersey 

Rosalie Taylor, Greenville, N. C. 

Michelle Telfair. Raleigh, N. C. 



[80] 




First row: 

Marion Moore Thomas. Charlotte, N. C. 
Frances Miriam Thornton, Wilmington, N. C. 
Elisabeth Holland Turner, Roanoke, Virginia 

Second row: 

Lucy Lee Vaughan, Cranford, New Jersey 

Patricia Exum Weaver, Asheville, N. C. 

Meta Nichols Wheeler. Marion, South Carolina 

Harriett Murray Whitaker, Kinston, N. C. 



Third row: 

Evelyn Ann White, Raleigh, N. C. 

Harrietts Newell Whitner. Charlotte, N. C. 

Helena Gracard Williams, Raleigh, N. C. 

Emily Yandell Williamson, Memphis, Tennessee 

Fourth row: 

Betty Ruth Windes, Raleigh, N. C. 

Betsy Randolph Winslow. Hertford, N. C. 

Margaret Penelope Winslow, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Alma Bryce Young, Dunn, N. C. 



[81 




BUSINESS 



This year, more than likely because of the serious 
shortage of office workers, the business class reached 
a peak in numbers which it has never before attained 
at Saint Mary's. The popularity of this course is not 
surprising since it makes of girls not merely trained 
and efficient executive secretaries, but well-rounded, 
well-informed members of society. 



Betty Michaux, Secretary; Betty .Suiter, President; 
Margie Linton, Vice President. 



Meta Bovkin Alexander 
Boykin, South Carolina 

Ruby Frederick Allen 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Helen Williams Batchelor 

Nashville, N. C. 



Pauline Hood Blanton 
Kinston, N. C. 

Mary Elizabeth Blount 
Washington, N. C. 

Meta Cantey Boykin 

Boykin, South Carolina 



Anne Cumming Burr 
Wilmington, N. C 

Peggy Virginia Cates 
Hillsboro, N. C. 

Emily Cheshire Townsend 
Raleigh. N. C. 




[82] 



Business 




First row: 

Caroline Banks Dial. Columbia. South Carolina 

Mary Lois Franks, Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Charles Godwin, Williamston, N. C. 

Shirley Gilbert Goode. Lynchburg, Virginia 

Second row: 

Jane Graham, Atlanta, Georgia 

Margaret Wyche Groover. Wilmington, N. C. 

Anne Maxwell Hull, Roanoke, Virginia 

Mary Edith Duvall Jlstice, Cheraw, S. C. 



Third row: 

Joyce Kiernan. Jackson Heights, L. I., N. Y. 
Martha Mitchell Kinsey. Petersburg, Virginia 
Margaret Andrews Linton, Charlottesville. Va. 
Elizabeth Lewis Michaux, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Fourth row: 

Ruth Rosenthal Moore. Whiteville, N. C. 
Frances Field McDavid, Raleigh, N. C. 
Martha Elizabeth Niven. Raleigh. N. C. 



[no -i 
83] 



usmess 




First row: 

Jeannette Harriet Parker, Jacksonville. Fla. 

Margaret Stalker Parker. Woodland, N. C. 

Mary Louise Parker. Clinton. N. C. 

Ann Trigg Phlegar. Norfolk, Virginia 

Second row: 

Lula Skinner Pulliam. Wilmington, N. C. 
Eleanor Taylor Redwood, Asheville, N. C. 
Muriel Craven Robinson, Richmond, Virginia 
Joan Blount Stell. Washington, D. C. 



Thud row: 

1 (ii Ward Stephenson. Raleigh. N. C. 
Virginia Dei.la Stockard, Graham, N. C. 
Anne Barrus Stouch. Ivinston, N. C. 
\1\kv Betty Suiter, Weldon. N. C. 

Fourth row: 

Ann Lyttleton Waddell. Charlottesville. Virgin! 
Amy Ethel Warner. Asheville. N. C. 
Neva Bidcood Whitaker. Kinston, N. C. 
Margaret Ervin Yount, Hickory, N. C. 



[84] 



SOPHOMORES 



High School graduates now. and freed from the 
"limitations" of underclassmen, these sophomores 
face a new college world, manpower limited, where 
the keynote is seriousness and hard work. 




Mary Dickey, Vice President; Laurie Lucas. President; 
Maybelle Smith, Secretary. 




, 



First row: 

Mary Catherine Archer. Charlottesville, Virginia 
Jane Durham Bell, Red Springs, N. C. 
Isabella Anne Bridger. Bladenboro, N. C. 
Anne Cabell Browninc, Culpeper. Virginia 
Barbara Dasiiiell Bruff. Knoxville, Tennessee 



Second rote: 

Ann Canon Brundage, Tryon, N. C. 

Felicia Beall Camm, Raleigh. N. C. 

Anne Elizabeth Damtoft. Asheville. N. C. 

Mary Gresham Dickey, Oxford. Chester County, Pa. 

Jane Rolfe Divers. Pulaski, Virginia 



[35] 




Sophomores 



Alice Ann Edmunds 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Mary Drewry Estes 
Cascade. Virginia 

Florence Elizabeth Ferguson 
Raleigh. N. C. 



Annette Thackweli. Fulton 
Raleigh. N. C. 

Lucy Frank Gardner 
Spring Hope, IV C. 

Mary Randolph Gardner 
Spring Hope. N. C. 



Evelyn Lucile Grant 
knowille. Tennessee 

Patricia LeMoine Hassi.er 
Thomasville, N. C. 

Martha Pace Hogg 

Beckley, West Virginia 



Mary Elizabeth Jones 
Talladega, Alabama 

Alice Lyle Kain 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Stella White Lassiter 
Potecasi, N. C. 



Jeannette I.eMaster 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Caroline Moncure Long 
Garysburg, N. C. 

Anne DeBoy Love 
Raleigh, N. C. 



St. Lawrence Fleming Lucas 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Merritte Dixon MacGrecor 
Columbus, Georgia 

Caroline Clarkson Myers 
Charlotte. N. C. 



lophomores 




First row: 

Mae Jean McCrory. Carter's Bridge, Virginia 
Patricia Farr Pagen, Seabright, California 
Elizabeth Adair Petesch. Birmingham, Alabama 
Margaret Jeffress Rodwell, Warrenton, IS. C. 



Third row: 

Betsy Scott Thompson, Graham, N. C. 
Irvin Jones (Peggy) Thorp. Fries. Virginia 
Mary Arden Tucker. Warrenton, N. C. 
Hetty Hope Via. Portsmouth, Virginia 



Second row: 

Sylvia Imocene Rogers, Smithfield, N. C. 
Maybelle Albertson Smith. Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Martha Washington Stoney. Anniston, Alabama 
Eleanor Randolph Thomas. Charlotte, N. C. 



Fourth row: 

Charlot Ann Waller. Morganfield, Kentuck) 
Marie Ai'leen Whisnant, Hickory. N. C. 
Mary Virginia Woodard. Rocky Mount. N. C. 
Mary Caldwell Yount, Hickory, N. C. 



37] 




FRESHMEN 



Young perhaps, and only midway on the pre- 
paratory road for college, hut always eager, full of 
life, and ready for anything, they head and guide 
their groups in ways l>e\ 1 their years. 



Alice Shamburger, Vice President; Ruth Sh.-i i ill. Presi- 
dent; Langhome Canington, Treasurer; Barbara \nn 
Ray, Secretary, 




First row: 

Betty Anne Bobbitt, Raleigh. N. C. 

Lillier Meredith Bridges. Charlotte, IN. C. 

Olive Buckley Camp. Franklin. Virginia 

Catherine Langhorne Carrington. Lynchburg, Va 



Second row: 

Fay Morgan Chambers. Marion. N. C. 
Pauline Jeanne Eagles, Fountain, N. C. 
Cordelia Wills Cant. Burlington, N. C. 
Evelyn Elizabeth Glenn. Greenville. N. C. 
Jane Gertrude Jeter. Raleigh, N. C. 



I 88 1 



Freshmen. 



Betty White Johnson 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Dorothy Christine Krusen 
Zephyrhills, Florida 

Ann Bruce Mauldin 
Rock Hill. S. C. 



Delight Thompson Nuchols 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Barbara Ann Ray 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Hannahlyn Riddle 
Raleigh. N. C. 



Janet McLane Rosser 
Vass, N. C. 

Dorothy Haywood Ruffin 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Ellen Brent Pearson Senay 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Alice Page Shamburger 
Aberdeen, N. C. 

Annie Askew Sharp 

Harrellsville, N. C. 

Ruth Sherrill 

Charlotte, N. C. 



Jeannette Wine Simpson 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Jane Elliot Sloan 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Floye Lowrance Smith 
Raleigh. N. C. 



Ann Holladay Stevens 
Burlington, N. C. 

Carolyn Joy Stewart 
Milan, Tennessee 

Phyllis Sherlock Thorpe 
Pelham Manor, New York 







PREPS 




First row: 

Ai.exa Heritage Blount, Pensacola, Florida 
Mary Ann Manship, Tatum, South Carolina 
Gertride Lawrence Murray Smith, 

Fairfield, Connecticut 



Second ron : 

Sarah Baker Everett. Palmyra. N. C. 
TheRESE Briswold Pagen, Seabright. California 
Kathryn Damaris Thornton. Palatka, Florida 



Certificate Students 



Obtaining a certificate in art, expression, or music indicates that a girl has "majored" in the 
subject for two years, taking special courses and working hard and long before easels, before 
footlights, or at the keyboard. 



BEVERLEY CLAY BROUN 



ART 

MARY HOLT DREWRY 



MARY ARDEN TUCKER 



MUSIC 

BETTY LOU BRITT MARY DREWRY ESTES 

MARY ETHEL COONS SARA DAPHNE RICHARDSON 

PATTIE JOALINE ROSS 

EXPRESSION 

SARAH LOUISE McKINLEY SARAH ELIZABETH SANBORN 

MARY BROOKS POPKINS MARGARET SPENCER SHACKELFORD 

MARY LOUISE THOMSON 



[ 90 ; 



THE USUAL TOOTHPASTE ADS 




Homeward bound. . . . This is so sudden. . . . What is she standing on? 
Who laughs last. . . . That February sun. . . . It's worth the wait. 
What, eating again? . . . 'Smarter, Lena? . . . Come on now, 'fess up.' .'.'. Big Day, that. 
Am I too heavy? . . . 
Let "er rip! ... It isn't that bad. Belty. . . . Smile, horsie lust posing, thank you. 



To Our 
STAGE COACH ADVERTISERS 

We express our appreciation and recommend 
the patronage of these firms 



Allen's Market 

Barbour Produce 

Blue Stor Stores 

Boylan-Pearce, Inc. 

Brantley & Son, Inc 

Bnggs & Sons, Inc, Thos H 

Boon-lseley Drug Store 

Brogden Produce Company 

Bynum Printing Company 

California Restaurant 

Capital Ice & Coal Co, Inc. 

Carolina Cleaners 

Carolina Hotel 

Carolina Coach Company 

Cromley-Melvin Drug Store 

Donations: Electric Service 
Cafeteria 
Wholesale Meats 

Eckerd's Drug Store 

Edwards & Broughton Company 

Ellisberg's — Ready-to-Wear 

Fallon Company, Inc., J J 

Hotel Sir Walter 

Hudson Fish & Oyster Co 

Hudson-Belk Co. 

Jean's 



Lance Packing Company 

Lewis', Inc 

Marsh Company, Inc, George 

Movie Theatres Ambassador 
Capitol 
Palace 
State 

Neiman's Jewelry Store 

Preston, Inc 

Royal Baking Company 

Royster's Candy 

Siddell Studio 

Staudt's Bakery 

Saint Mary's School 

Standard Supply Company 

Strop To xi Company 

Taylor's, Inc 

Thiem, James E 

Walgreen's Drug Store 

White Ice Cream Co 

Williams & Company, Alfred 

Wright's Dairy 

Wyatt & Sons, Job P. 



The STAGE COACH is the only publication of Saint Mary's School and Junior 
College for which advertisements are accepted. A bulletin board list of our adver- 
tisers is kept at the school during the full session. 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES . . . 

FOUNTAIN PENS 

Sheaffer - Parker 

Eversharp - Waterman 


The New Silk Lastex 

J ANTZEN 

Bathing Suit Has All the 
Glamour and Style 

It's the Perfect 
SWIM SUIT 


KODAKS and SUPPLIES 


ALBUMS - MEMORY BOOKS 


Loose Leaf Books 
Stationery 


RECORDS and SHEET MUSIC 
"House of Quality' 

JAMES E. THIEM 

Phone 2-2913 Raleigh, N. C. 
108 Fayetteville St. 


Lewis' Incorporated 

112 W. Horgett Street 
Phone 5524 


CROMLEY-MELVIN 
DRUGS 


MEET 

at the 

CALIFORNIA 
RESTAURANT 

1 1 1 Fayetteville Street 


TWO STORES 

CAMERON PARK 

Phone 5834 


SIR WALTER HOTEL BLDG. 

Phone 7533 


Lunches and Fountain Service 

that delight the most 

fastidious 


Complete 
Drug Store Service 



TAYLOR 



J ' 



"The Show Place of the Carolincfs" 

YOU CAN FIND AT THIS GOOD STORE 

MOST ANYTHING DESIRED AT 

PRICES YOU WISH 

TO PAY 



We Appreciate . 



your patronage of the past 
season and sincerely trust our 
efforts to offer you the best 
in entertainment has been 
successful. 



AMBASSADOR 

STATE 

PALACE 

CAPITOL 

Operated by 
North Carolina Theatre 



THE HOTEL 

that is known as headquarters for 

Saint Mary's Visitors 



The . . . 
Hotel Sir Walter 

Rates $2.50 Upward 

"Ken" Phillips, Manager 



CAPITAL ICE & COAL COMPANY, Inc. 


PHONE 5589 RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


• 


WE SUPPLY THE ICE FOR YOUR REFRIGERATORS 


AND THE FUEL FOR YOUR HEATING PLANT 


• 


We Hope We Add to Your Comfort 


A 


WRIGHTS DAIRY 


* 

BLUE STAR STORES 

HOME OWNED 


The Pines 


We Furnish Your Milk. 
and Cream 


Garner Road — RFD No. 2 


BROGDEN PRODUCE 
COMPANY 


STROP TAXI CO. 

50c a Trip in City Limit 


WHOLESALE FRUITS 
PRODUCE 


ONE or FOUR 

PHONE 5811 


Dining Room Supplies 


Oldest — Most Reliable 



CAROLINA COACH COMPANY 


Comfort Convenience Courtesy 


• 


Ask the Girls Who Ride 


GEO. MARSH CO., Inc. 


Say— 


It holesale Grttcers 


"BAMBY" 


310 South Harrington Street 


ROYAL BAKING CO. 


Raleigh, N C. 


B. STREB, Prop. 


CAROLINA CLEANERS 


F LOWERS ! 


Phone 8S7I 116 Harrison Ave 

Dry Cleaning - Pressing 
Altering - Dyeing 


Cut Flowers, Corsages, Graduation 
Bouquets, Decorations 

Phone 8347 


Odorless Work of the Highest Quality 
Prompt, Efficient Service 


J. J. FALLON CO., Inc. 

"We Grow the Flowers We Sell" 


Thos. H. Briggs & Sons 


SIDDELL STUDIO 


Incorporated 

HARDWARE 


Raleigh, N. C. 

• 


220 Fayetteville Street 

Raleigh, N. C. 

"The Convenient Plac( to Shop" 


Official Photographer 

The Stage Coach 



BRANTLEY'S 




DRUG STORE 




The Place to Meet 




Your Friends 


"CHEAP 


For the BEST 

SODAS - ICE CREAM 
COSMETICS 


ELECTRICITY 

IS 

CHEAPER STILL" 


Drop in 




135 Fayetteville Street 




or Telephone 8834 




LANCE PACKING 


Always the Newest 


COMPANY, Inc. 


. . . in . . . 
QUALITY 




PEANUT PRODUCTS 


MERCHANDISE 


CANDIES 






• 
Boylan-Pearce, Inc. 


Charlotte - Greensboro 


North Carolina 


"Raleigh's Shopping Center" 



DONATION 

WHOLESALE MEATS 


DONATION 

EASTERN CAROLINA'S 
FINEST CAFETERIA 


An Afternoon "Bile" 


Hudson Fish and Oyster 
Company 

Sea Foods for Your 
Dining Room 

Phone 5846 Raleigh 


delightfully served in our 
cozy place is on oc- 
casion most enjoyable 

Meet your friends here! 

• 

STAUDT'S 
RETAIL STORE 

"Across the street from the Ca/mpms" 


JEWELERS-SILVERSmiTHS 

RALEIGH. N.C. 

Phone 7704 
109 Fayetteville Street 


"ROYSTER'S" 

Since 1865 

207 Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 

To eat stale nnulu is so silly, 

When fresh candy can be bought in 

lln hunt of the city. 


BYNUM PRINTING 
COMPANY 

BETTER PRINTING 

Phone 6417 
Raleigh, N. C. 



WHITE'S ICE CREAM 

"There IS a Difference" 



We Supply the Little 
Store 



JobP.Wyatt&Sons 
Company 



HARDWARE and SEED 

BULBS, PLANTS 

and 

GARDEN SUPPLIES 



325-327 S. Wilmington Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Alfred Williams & Co. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Social Engraving 

Diplomas Certificates 

Commencement Invitations 

Books of All Publishers 

Established 1807 



Visit Raleigh's Finest and 
Largest Drug Store 

PATENT MEDICINES 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

COSMETICS . SUNDRIES 

Eckerds 

SODA FOUNTAIN and 
LUNCHEONETTE 



EVERYTHING 
For Saint Mary's Girls 

Phone 8675 



Raleigh's Smartest Shop 



.•B"" 



(elusbto 



126 Fayetteville Street 
Featuring — 

SMART, STYLISH 
APPAREL 

For the College Miss Who Aspires 

to the Distinction of Being 

Smartly Gowned at 

All Times. 



Hudson-Belt Company 

Raleigh's Largest Department Store 

Appreciates your patronage during the school 

year just ending; ami looks forward 

to serving you again during 

the coming vear. 



BOON-ISELEY'S 
DRUG STORE 

"The College Drug Store" 

Max Factor and Dorothy Grey 
Beauty Preparations 



Fayetteville Street 
PHONE 7728 

Open Day and Night 



THE STANDARD 
SUPPLY CO., Inc. 



PLUMBING and 
HEATING 
SUPPLIES 



GREENVILLE 

FAYETTEVILLE 

RALEIGH 

NORTH CAROLINA 



ALLEN'S MARKET 

15 S Dawson Street 


SAINT MARY'S 
STUDENTS 

Are Always Welcome 
at 

WALGREEN'S 


The Best in Table 
Delicacies 

Phone 4663 


BARBOUR PRODUCE 
COMPANY 


Fruits and Vegetables 


Raleigh's Most Popular 
DRUG STORE 


CITY MARKET 
Raleigh, North Carolina 


HOTEL 
CAROLI NA 


Lovely things at little prices 

108 Fayetteville Street 
Phone 4635 Raleigh, N. C. 


The Nearest to 
Saint Mary's 


■ ■•«»%lon 

■TIC. 

112 Fayetteville Street 


Phone 8811 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Mrs Ernest Cruikshank, A M., President 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

High School graduates are offered two years of Grade A College work. 
The Curriculum also includes 1 Oth, 1 1th, and 12th grades of High School 
work. All Academic Courses fully accredited by the Southern Association. 

Excellent Courses in Art, Business, Expression, Home Economics 

and Music Departments with Tuition included 

in General Charge 

Twenty-Acre Campus — Field Sports — Gymnasium — Tennis 

Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool — Horseback Riding — Golf 

ANNUAL SESSIONS — MID-SEPTEMBER TO JUNE 

Write A. W. Tucker, Business Manager, for Catalogue and View Book 



Render Unto Caesar" . . . 

Few students when they read THE STAGE COACH and look with 
interest through its pages realize the long hours of continued 
effort and capability required of the staff in the preparation 
of copy, calls on the merchants, and the many other endless 
duties required of an efficient staff member So — give it a 
thought and render a tribute to those staff members of your 
publication who have served faithfully their school and their 
fellow students in these extra curricula activities 



Edwards & B rough ton Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



AUTO-GRAPHS 






AUTOGRAPHS 



14499 

Not to be taken from this room 





SSO TET : E/ GO PES 
REPRESENT NUMBER 
OE PEOPLE AT 
SA//VT MAPy'S EPOM 

each state: 

PRAN£ 



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